News & Updates

Troutfest

Join 3 Rivers Angler and Dave Chouinard of Simms for a free Beer! 3 Rivers Angler Cheers for Charity Series continues Thursday May 17th benefiting Troutfest!

Pick up a free glass of beer from 3 Rivers Angler, Eagle Distributing, and Simms filled by Relix and lend your support to Troutfest. Dave Chouinard will be in attendance with the Simms Bus and the entire line of Simms apparel and waders.


The first 200 people get a free pint of beer, and extra fill-ups are a donation of $5 to benefit Troutfest. All proceeds from beer sales and 10% of proceeds from sales in the store from 6-8pm will go to the Troutfest. Must be 21 years old, bring your I.D.


Where: 3 Rivers Angler, 5113 Kingston Pike

When: May 17th, 2012 (6 - 8:00pm) - Rain or Shine

Contact: (865) 200-5271

tim rajeff casteandoFind fly casting in the dictionary and synonyms will include Rajeff, Tim & Steve. Tim Rajeff comes from a family of fly casters, fly rod designers & fly fishermen and we are thrilled to have Tim with us April 30th!

Tim’s brother Steve Rajeff holds virtually every fly casting record in the world and if Tim wasn’t so busy designing Rods for Echo, and trying to break them with forklifts, he’d be giving his brother a run for his money! Nonetheless, both Steve & Tim Rajeff are arguably the best fly casters, teachers of fly casting on the planet.

Tim has a bigger than life personality & knows how to make casting & learning fun.  This is a Monday-Funday you don’t want to miss! All are welcome to attend! Casting demonstration starts at 12:00 Sharp.

Tim will be discussing everything fly casting ranging from tips to improve your single hand cast, the development and growing movement of the switch rod revolution and two handed spey casting.  Everyone is strongly encouraged and welcome to attend.

Tim Rajeff Individual Fly Casting Instruction

Following the demo, Tim will be offering a three hour fly casting Lesson for 5 people. The opportunity to cast and learn from Tim Rajeff does not come around often so be sure to sign up before it’s too late. The cost of this three hour lesson limited to 5 people is $100. To register call the shop at 865.200.5271.

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Never get out of the boat, because out of the boat and out on the flats are where reality and dreams collide.  In the wee hours of dawn, when you first board the Panga, you’re permitted a dose of optimism and, in fact, it is required. Like a hormone that blocks the pain of yesterday’s mistakes, optimism reigns supreme at first light. It’s only when the engine cuts and you drift to the edge of the first flat of the day that apprehension and fear begin to creep into your collective conscious.  Images of pigtailed tippet and stolen flies flash through your frontal lobe as you step from the bow and try to keep your focus on the spot on the horizon where you last saw some suggestion that hinted that a Permit was present.

Permit fishing, at best, is a masochist’s pursuit.  Any fishing where good conditions include a 25-knot breeze should be met with suspicion. And the first shot of the day, when you’re required to hop from the comfortable optimism which abounds onboard the Panaga and into the waist-deep water to confront your demons, dictates how future encounters will unfold.  If you’re not prepared for abject and repeated failure then its best never get out. 

The first indication that Spring has finally arrived, contrary to popular opinion, has nothing to do with a ground hog. In fact, in Knoxville it’s actually announced by the presence of vehicles at the mouth of third creek along Neyland Drive and current indicators suggest that spring has not only arrived but has done so in style with a full triple lindy. I’m not sure what happened to old man winter this year but I am certain that I don’t really miss him (let’s circle back around to this in a month or so, I suspect mosquito and tick levels may have me singing a different tune).

Cars at the mouth of Third Creek, for those not in the know, indicate the arrival of the white bass migration. White bass (aka “whites” or “stripes”) doggedly head up stream in order to reproduce when conditions dictate. They’re cued in part by water temperatures, light intensity, and current and since we’ve had an overabundance of two of the three this year it looks like the ground hog’s prediction for six more weeks of winter was squarely wrong. Fishing for Stripes in the southeast is a rite of spring and a great opportunity for any angler to get out and knock the cobwebs off their cast. In late winter these fish move up the Ft. Loudon system through downtown Knoxville into the headwaters of the Tennessee River and the tributaries beyond. They stage in eddies off the main channel and feed ravenously until water temperatures get high enough for them to continue their upstream migration into feeder rivers and creeks in order to spawn.